What We Do


CPP Training

CPP Training

CPP Training for COCOMs
MilCHAG creates CPP training and awareness materials and collaborates with COCOM personnel to support unit training and increase awareness of practical requirements and legal obligations to protect cultural property in every country and region … Read more →


CPP Training for ROTC
The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a university-based program through which college students are trained and, upon graduation, commissioned as officers in the U.S. military. The program’s primary mission is to train and develop… Read more →


SME Guest Lecture Program

The Subject Matter Expert (SME) Guest Lecture Initiative introduces ROTC cadets and midshipmen to the basics of cultural property protection (CPP) in military operations: legal and regulatory drivers, key cultural heritage concepts, strategic implications … Read more →


CPP Training for ROTC

The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a university-based program through which students are trained and, upon graduation, commissioned as officers in the US military. The program’s primary mission is to train and develop professional and competent leaders. Around 30 percent of active duty officers and 22 percent of reserve officers in the Department of Defense (DoD) were commissioned through ROTC in 2010 (source: U.S. Department of Defense, Population Representation in the Military Services, Appendix B, Table B-30).

Why Should CPP Be Taught to ROTC Cadets?

Cultural Property Protection (CPP) is legally mandated and ethically obligated in U.S. military operations. A Government Accountability Office report from 2011 identified significant shortfalls in the culture training and readiness of U.S. forces.

While the DoD tends to focus on behavioral and ideational concepts of culture and heritage, cultural property is an essential element of the total culture package, and protecting it during military operations is a legal requirement.

ROTC is an entry-level training program for America’s officer corps, and must be included in the culture training strategy.

Like all ethical and legal obligations, CPP should be hard-wired in our military leaders from the beginning of their professional development, so that awareness of CPP issues and sound decisions will be second nature during full spectrum operations overseas.

By imparting CPP principles and techniques to future officers during a formative period in their careers, MilCHAG assists in preparing tomorrow’s leaders to meet future challenges.

Training Methodology

Our CPP training products for ROTC have minimal impact on current program structures, are focused on military interests and concerns, employ recent case studies, and are available free of charge.

MilCHAG offers two complementary approaches to this training:

  1. We collaborate with the individual ROTC branch commands to integrate elements of CPP training into current curricula where appropriate. For example, Army Cadet Command has tentatively adopted slides about legal drivers for CPP into its “Law of Land Warfare and ROE” class, which is delivered to all Army ROTC cadets nationwide.
  2. We provide stand-alone training that presents all relevant CPP material at once. Ideally, this material will be delivered in-person by a volunteer Subject Matter Expert (SME).
  3. To facilitate SME involvement in CPP training for ROTC, we have developed various support products. For ROTC programs without access to a local SME, we are also developing free, downloadable 50-minute webinars for each branch of service that will cover much the same material.

Documents

Guest Lecturer’s Guide to the Military

Army ROTC CPP Training – SME Lecture Primer

Slides: PDF | PowerPoint

Army ROTC SME primer


SME Guest Lecture Program

The Subject Matter Expert (SME) Guest Lecture Initiative introduces ROTC cadets and midshipmen to the basics of cultural property protection (CPP) in military operations: legal and regulatory drivers, key cultural heritage concepts, strategic implications of protecting (and failing to protect) cultural property, including case studies from actual military operations. This material is currently being integrated into course curricula for the various ROTC branch programs.

The SME guest lecture is a 50-minute training module that addresses all the above material and more. There are several advantages to having an SME present the material live and in a single block. First, CPP concepts can be covered in more depth, in their own context, and with an opportunity for audience questions.

These lectures encourage understanding and mutual appreciation between the academic and military communities through person-to-person interactions. They also encourage networking: you can choose to offer yourself as a point of contact for these young future officers, someone whom they could contact throughout the remainder of their military careers should they encounter a cultural property related challenge.

Who should volunteer?

We encourage volunteers who are professors of archaeology or art history and other members of the academic or professional communities who deal with material culture or cultural resource management. While many of our products and training materials explicitly address the archaeology community, we welcome volunteers from a variety of fields.

Why should you volunteer?

As noted in this brochure {not available}, the academic and professional community can make a real difference in training our military personnel to be responsible stewards of global heritage. By taking part in this SME lecture initiative, you can:

  1. Encourage understanding and mutual appreciation between the academic and military communities.
  2. Facilitate networking, communication, and exchange of knowledge between cultural heritage/cultural property experts and military science programs.
  3. Play an active role in protecting cultural property that may be threatened by conflict or crisis.

Download our SME support materials

On this page, you will find links to products that will support you in contacting ROTC units, building your guest lecture, and engaging with the ROTC cadets, midshipmen, and cadre.

PowerPoint Primer. Below and to the right are links to the first branch-specific PowerPoint primers and suggested lecture script developed by MilCHAG for Guest Lecturers.

The first 25 to 30 minutes of the lecture covers all of the core CPP concepts when viewed within a military context.

The remaining 20-25 minutes will consist of your own lecture material about your area of expertise, with personal experiences and anecdotes, followed by a Q&A session. Click to download the Army ROTC primer presentation {not available} and sample script {not available}. ROTC primers for other branches are now in development.

Guest Lecturer’s Guide to the Military. This short document provides advice for building your portion of the SME lecture, and answers common questions and concerns for those who may not have worked with the military before. Click to view the Guest Lecturer’s Guide to the Military for Cultural Property SME Instructors. {not available}

Sharing your expertise with the next generation of military leaders on an important topic will be a beneficial experience. ROTC cadets, midshipmen, and staff will thank you for your service.


CPP Training for COCOMs

MilCHAG creates CPP training and awareness raising materials and collaborates with COCOM personnel to support unit training and increase awareness of practical requirements and legal obligations to protect cultural property in every country and region where DOD operates. MilCHAG’s training goals are to:

  1. Improve situational awareness to minimize damage to cultural and heritage property, consistent with current Rules of Engagement;
  2. Provide experience that involves cultural and heritage property during Full Spectrum Operations (with in-theater training; by developing MSELs for use during military exercises; and by creating mock cultural property and archaeological sites for training purposes);
  3. Provide Air Force and Navy Pilots with heritage training avoidance practice in the training environment (with in-theater training and by creating replica targets for aerial gunnery practice);
  4. Promote awareness of national and international laws that protect cultural property in every host nation where DOD operates;
  5. Discourage the purchase of antiquities or other protected cultural property while operating in-theater;
  6. Discourage unnecessary damage to heritage property while operating in-theater;
  7. Improve awareness of host national cultural heritage, promote respect among local populations;
  8. Share tactics and techniques for using Cultural Property Protection (CPP) as a force multiplier and an effective use of “soft power” which advances DOD’s Cultural Intelligence goals.

By leveraging Fort Drum’s well-recognized program for training U.S. military personnel in historical and cultural property protection, MilCHAG provides training materials for COCOMS to close the ‘knowledge gap” and deliver effective heritage planning and training for deploying personnel and to personnel operating in-theater.

MilCHAG presentations make best use of time spent and feature localized content and examples suitable for any COCOM or JF audience. To view examples, click the video below or any of the images to the right:


Products That Serve

Mapping and GIS Data
COCOM and Joint Force decision makers need an always-current database of the terrain within their area of responsibility — including all relevant environmental and historical/cultural resource data, with site names and coordinates… Read more →


Master Scenario Events List
The Master Scenario Events List, also known as the Mission Scenario Event List or Master Sequence of Events List, is a context-based training scenario that is woven into a training exercise… Read more →


Mock Training Assets and Sites
Preservation of archaeological sites and cultural properties on military lands and in the U.S. and theaters of operation outside the U.S. is an essential element to every mission and training exercise. The 17-page booklet… Read more →


Outreach and Support Materials
MilCHAG creates a variety of outreach and support materials that increase cultural heritage awareness, deepen our understanding of the military’s role in cultural heritage protection, and demonstrate our leadership in … Read more →


Presentations
MilCHAG subject matter experts create easy-to-understand Powerpoint presentations for training or awareness raising purposes. MilCHAG presentations make best use of time spent, and feature localized content and examples suitable for any COCOM or Joint Force audience. …. Read more →


GIS Data Layers

COCOM and Joint Force decision makers need a constantly updated database of the terrain, assets, opportunities and risks within their area of responsibility — including all relevant environmental and historical/cultural resource data, with site names and coordinates that have been validated and are compliant with Expeditionary and Strategic Geobase programs.

MilCHAG’s skilled practitioners and subject matter experts provide the expertise and technology that COCOM and JF decision makers require to quality a more detailed and nuanced understanding of the mission landscape.

In 2011, MilCHAG co-founder James A. Zeidler (Associate Director and Senior Research Scientist, CEMML, Colorado State Univ.) and Stephen A. Sherman (staff archaeologist and Research Associate IV, CEMML) co-authored the manual “Quality Assurance / Quality Control of Archaeological Site Location Data in Afghanistan” for the U.S. Air Force HQ Air Combat Command and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The manual provides quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) review of locational point data for known archaeological sites in Afghanistan for use by DOD personnel in avoiding or reducing impacts to cultural properties from military activities.

Using the DOD’s high-resolution BUCKEYE imagery, existing archaeological site data sets from several sources were critically reviewed for geospatial accuracy and suitability for military planning and operations in order to minimize effects to host country heritage. Results indicate the promise of combining tools of varying resolution and scope in a staged procedure, while highlighting the need for ground-truthing and determining an acceptable measure of accuracy.

With properly validated GIS data, war planner gain a deeper understanding of the problems that can be triggered in regions with ancient sites and monuments that are protected under international law and/or the laws of the host country.

MilCHAG GIS specialists deliver the right data to the right people at the right time, before, during and after combat situations — to support the mission. And decision makers at all levels, from war planners and battlefield commanders to post-conflict engineering teams, rely upon MilCHAG deliverables to make effective, timely and well-informed judgments.

In 2011, MilCHAG co-founder James A. Zeidler (Associate Director and Senior Research Scientist, CEMML, Colorado State University) and Stephen A. Sherman (staff archaeologist and Research Associate IV, CEMML) co-authored the manual “Quality Assurance / Quality Control of Archaeological Site Location Data in Afghanistan” for the U.S. Air Force HQ Air Combat Command and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The manual, for official use only, employs DoD high-resolution BUCKEYE imagery to verify existing archaeological site data sets for geospatial accuracy and suitability for use in military planning and operations to minimize effects to host country heritage during Operating Enduring Freedom. This work is FOUO, not available to the public.


Master Scenario Events List

The Master Scenario Events List (MSEL) — also known as the Mission Scenario Events List or Master Sequence of Events List — is a context-based training scenario with a sequence of expected actions and scripted events that are woven into a training exercise to illustrate a particular lesson or training objective.

MilCHAG enhances CPP awareness by providing MSELs that include situations involving historical or cultural property that war planners, OICs and ground forces may encounter during conflict situations in heritage-rich nations and regions.

For Exercise Bright Star 2009 (multinational training exercises conducted in Egypt), MilCHAG developed eight MSELs with realistic scenarios that USCENTCOM, USARCENT/Third Army, Egyptian Armed Forces and Allied forces may encounter during the exercise to learn proper tactics and procedures when encountering cultural property during armed conflict. Each MSEL provided:

  • the training objective or theme;
  • the scenario the troops would encounter (expected event or series of events);
  • the recommended response (specific action, series of actions or alternatives consistent with Rules of Engagement); and
  • the “implementer” or trigger for taking the described action.

Master Scenario Events Lists provided by MilCHAG for use in the 2009 Exercise Bright Star (joint training exercises in Egypt) offered realistic scenarios that US, Egyptian and Allied armed forces may encounter during conflict situations where archaeological sites or other cultural properties are present.

One MSEL involved the challenges that troops will face during a military engagement at a sacred site. Another MSEL involved a platoon encountering a team of armed looters at an archaeological site who open fire on the platoon. Another MSEL offered troops the basic “do’s” and “dont’s” when bedding down near an archaeological site. Another MSEL offered a scenario in which an adversary makes first military use of a cultural or sacred site.

By including cultural property protection issues into military exercises with MSEL training, the likelihood of error during armed conflict in heritage-rich regions is reduced and situational awareness on the battlefield is enhanced while meeting important obligations under US law, host nation law, international law and DoD cultural resources policy.


Mock Training Assets + Sites

Preservation of archaeological sites and cultural properties on military lands and in the U.S. and theaters of operation outside the U.S. is an essential element to every mission and training exercise.

The 17-page booklet “In-Theater Cultural Resources Training Assets: Construction Specifications,” developed by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie Rush, Cultural Resources Program Manager at Fort Drum, New York, offers expert solutions for the construction of training assets, which replicate a variety of cultural properties that personnel may encounter overseas. These training assets have been integrated into training at Fort Drum, which trainers have found highly useful.

To order a copy of this MilCHAG publication, use the Contact Us link at the top of the page.


Outreach + Support Materials

MilCHAG creates a variety of outreach and support materials — including books, journal articles, pamphlets, posters, presentations and other materials — that increase cultural heritage awareness, deepen our understanding of the military’s role in cultural property protection and demonstrate DoD’s leadership in this rapidly evolving field. These materials are part of a vast knowledge base that is incorporated in the many training and service offerings that MilCHAG can customize to meet any COCOM or Joint Force requirement.

Journal Articles

The recently-published “Cultural Property Protection as a Force Multiplier in Stability Operations,” by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie W. Rush (click the image to the right to download) makes a compelling case for the need to enhance Cultural Property Protection (CPP) training within DoD and promote the consideration of CPP during all DoD operations and undertakings.

Click this link to download “Cultural Property Protection as a Force Multiplier in Stability Operations,” by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie W. Rush, published in Military Review, March-April, 2012.

Presentations

MilCHAG subject matter experts create easy-to-understand Powerpoint presentations for training or awareness raising purposes. MilCHAG presentations make best use of time spent, and feature localized content and examples suitable for any COCOM or Joint Force audience. To view a presentation delivered by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie W. Rush at the American Academy of Rome, click the video image to the right. Additional presentations are available below and on the Presentations page.

  1. Cultural Property on the Battlefield, developed by Laurie W. Rush, discusses various methods for identifying cultural property on the battlefield, including:
    — the use of mapping as a cultural property discovery tool;
    — guidance for identifying archaeological sites, historic structures and natural wonders while operating in-theater;
    — mapping and geospatial data as tools during combat and contingency operations;
    — using visual clues in the landscape to identify unmapped cultural features
    — additional guidance to identify cultural property that may be most significant to local populations, such as sacred places and community spaces, which do not appear on any map.
  2. In-Theater Heritage Training for Deploying Personnel, also created by Dr. Rush, focuses on archeological sites, providing much-needed awareness for a more sophisticated understanding of the operational landscape in unfamiliar territory. The course outline includes:
    — Introduction and Regulatory and Legal Drivers;
    — Need for Cultural Resources Awareness in the Global Setting
    — Theater and Global Examples;
    — Basic ‘Do’s” and “Dont’s” of Cultural Property Protection;
    — Potential Impacts of Not Following Basic CPP Principles;
    — Guidelines for Response to Heritage Challenges … Getting it Right;
    — Resources and Training Information; and
    — Associated Considerations.
  3. Cultural Property Protection in Armed Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations, created by Colonel (Ret.) Dick Jackson (Special Assistant to the U.S. Army Judge Advocate General for Law of War Matters; Adjunct Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center) discusses the principal legal requirements that U.S. forces must respect during conflict and post-conflict operations.

Presentations

MilCHAG subject matter experts create easy-to-understand Powerpoint presentations for training or awareness raising purposes. MilCHAG presentations make best use of time spent, and feature localized content and examples suitable for any COCOM or Joint Force audience. To view a presentation delivered by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie W. Rush at the American Academy of Rome, click the video image below. Additional presentations can be viewed by clicking any of the images below or the links to the left.


In-Theater Training Aids

Soldier Pocket Card

MilCHAG co-founder James Zeidler at the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML) has designed a double-sided Soldier Pocket Card, which provides… Read more →

CPP Field Cards

These handy cards, developed by MilCHAG co-founder Laurie Rush, Cultural Resources Manager at Fort Drum, NY, provide more detailed CPP information … Read more →

Heritage Resource Protection Playing Cards

Teaching the basics of Cultural Property Protection (CPP) was a significant challenge for the U.S. military during Operation Iraq Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom and Exercise Bright Star. Having long recognized that educational playing cards are a good way to capitalize on the time soldiers spend waiting for orders, playing cards proved to be a good vehicle for this type of instruction… Read more →


CPP Soldier Pocket Card

Soldier Pocket Card

James A. Zeidler and MilCHAG team members at CEMML (The Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands at Colorado State University) have designed a double-sided Soldier Pocket Card that provides CPP information relating to the soldier’s area of responsibility and space to record unmapped cultural features that the soldier may encounter. Printed on waterproof card stock, the Soldier Pocket Card fits neatly into the shoulder or leg pocket of a standard issue U.S. Army combat uniform.

Click to download the Soldier Pocket Card as a print-ready PDF.


CPP Field Cards

Field CardsThese six sets of cards, developed by MilCHAG co-founder Dr. Laurie W. Rush, Cultural Resources Manager in the Directorate of Public Works Environmental Division at Fort Drum, NY, provide the right CPP information to the right personnel at the right time in a handy format that can be easily tucked into a pocket during operations.

CPP Toolkit, References and Resources.

This three-card set is designed as a ready reference for the field commander who may require additional sources of information, reach-back expertise or other assets to solve a cultural property challenge going forward. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).

DOs and DON’Ts When Encountering Archaeological, Historic or Cultural Properties, Sacred Places and Other Sites That Are Subject to Official Protection.

This nine-card set is designed as a portable guide to remind personnel in the field of the basic “rules of the road” when archaeological, cultural or historic properties or sacred places are encountered during operations. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).

Bed Down Recommendations and Treatment Options for Onsite Cultural Property Protection.

This thirteen-card set highlights the most commonly used barrier and containment technologies that are currently used in the field. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).

Recommended Construction Site Survey Process within the AOR.

This six-card set provides basic guidance for performing an environmental baseline survey for cultural property. This card set offers guidelines for performing a site survey, tips for performing a records check and conducting interviews, guidelines for assessing impact levels, guidelines for documenting your survey results, and an Engineering Archaeology Checklist to guide decision making when operating in the field. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).

Reporting Cultural Property in the Field.

This three-card set provides guidelines for submitted a properly detailed report. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).

Recommendations for Submitting Cultural Property Data to the MIBD.

This four-card set provides basic instruction and examples for submitting information to the Modernized Integrated Database (MIDB), the Department of Defense Intelligence Information System Intelligence Mission Application. Click to download this CPP Field Card as a print-ready PDF (four cards per sheet).


CPP Playing Cards

The Warner College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University featured the Heritage Resource Preservation playing cards in a May, 2014 online article. Click to view.

Teaching the basics of Cultural Property Protection (CPP) was a significant challenge for the U.S. military during Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Exercise Bright Star in Egypt. Since DoD has long recognized that educational playing cards are a good way to capitalize on the time soldiers spend waiting for orders, playing cards proved ideal for this type of instruction.

The Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards were designed to educate U.S. military personnel about the importance of respecting ancient sites and monuments and preserving host nation cultural heritage during military operations and post-conflict reconstruction.

Three unique sets of playing cards were created for personnel serving in Iraq, Afghanistan and Egypt. Each playing card conveys a specific message, and each suit in the deck has a theme: diamonds for artifacts and treasures; spades for historic sites and archaeological digs; hearts for “winning hearts and minds”; and clubs for heritage preservation. Click the images below to view the messages on individual playing cards.

Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards for Exercise Bright Star 2009

Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards for Exercise Bright Star 2009

Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards for Operation Enduring Freedom

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Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards for Operation Iraqi Freedom

The Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards were developed as part of the “In-Theater Heritage Training for Deploying Personnel” program by the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML) at Colorado State University and the Fort Drum Cultural Resources Program, with support provided by the DoD Legacy Resource Management Program at the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment. On November 7, 2007, the “In-Theater Heritage Training for Deploying Personnel” program received the Chairman’s Award from the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, an independent federal agency that promotes the preservation, enhancement, and productive use of historic resources in the United States and advises the President and Congress on national historic preservation policy.

Heritage Resource Preservation Playing Cards for Operation Iraqi Freedom


Services That Protect

Satellite Imagery Analysis

DoD mission planners need the right tools, technologies and expertise in order to maintain a complete understanding of the mission landscape. The ability to identify areas of local importance in unfamiliar host nations with a high reliability… Read more →


Military Lands Sustainability Training

The breadth and complexity of military land management dictates that current and future professionals be knowledgeable of the rapidly evolving practices, technologies and analytical tools that support the mission … Read more →


Policy Research

MilCHAG is committed to critical thinking on issues relating to Cultural Property Protection (CPP) by US Forces and conducts research that informs environmental and related policies, regulations and guidelines within DoD. We also share… Read more →


CPP Bibliographical Database

With more than 1,300 books, journal articles and white papers, fully annotated  covering every aspect of historical and cultural property protection within the context of military operation, this downloadable database…. Read more →


ICOM Red Lists

Compiled by the International Council of Museums, the Red Lists classify the most endangered categories of cultural property in the most vulnerable areas of the world, in an effort to prevent them being illegally exported. This valuable resource… Read more →


Satellite Imagery Analysis

DoD mission planners need the right mix of tools, technologies, and expertise in order to maintain a complete understanding of the mission landscape.

The ability to identify areas of local importance in unfamiliar host nations with a high degree of reliability gives the mission planner the necessary information to take protection of these features into consideration when developing the plan.

Subject matter experts and technology partners at the MilCHAG employ satellite remote sensing and various forms of aerial and satellite imagery to identify archaeological sites and significant cultural features on the ground that must be protected, consistent with Rules of Engagement.

MilCHAG’s SMEs can acquire, interpret and package this aerial and satellite imagery and satellite remote sensing data for use by COCOMs and JF Planners and Engineers for every region where appropriate imagery is available.

In 2012 MilCHAG team member Dr. Sarah Parcak (University of Alabama at Birmingham) completed the DOD Satellite Archaeology Manual for the Middle East ( U.S. Air Force ORCHID Series, Reports of Investigations, Number 3). Prepared by the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands, Colorado State University and Geo-Marine Inc. (Plano, TX) for the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, this valuable work provides DOD planners and engineers with an overview of the challenges and objectives of this type of data collection with a step by step guide for using various forms of imagery and techniques for interpreting the data. This manual empowers DOD planners with responsibility in all AORs to take cultural property into consideration as a component of effective planning and develop a more detailed and nuanced understanding of mission landscapes in unfamiliar environments.


Military Lands Training

Training and maintaining our nation’s fighting force is the primary mission of the Department of Defense. However with nearly 30 million acres, containing thousands of known archaeological sites, and over half the historic assets in the Federal real property portfolio, DoD has considerable regulatory and stewardship responsibilities for the vast array of historic properties under its care.

The breadth and complexity of military land management dictates that current and future professionals be knowledgeable of the rapidly evolving practices, technologies and analytical tools that support this critical national defense mission. Yet shrinking budgets and shifting national priorities require DoD Cultural Resources Managers to continuously “do more with less,” and develop strong partnerships both inside and outside of DoD, to have the tools and resources to get the job done.

The Sustainable Military Lands Management (SMLM) Training and Certification Program conducted by the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML) at Colorado State University fills this knowledge gap by offering expert training, testing and certification conducted by MilCHAG team leaders and subject matter experts in a cost- and time-efficient course. Those who complete the program:

  • Gain an overview of military lands in the United States in historical, geographical, and environmental contexts.
  • Learn the general practices and theory of land management, as well as cultural anthropology.
  • Study the ecological principles of military training and testing areas and the impacts of disturbances caused by these activities.
  • Explore cultural resources laws, policies, management, and preservation as they apply to military lands.
  • Prepare to lead stewardship-related matters on military lands.
  • Apply your knowledge and skills to a wide array of federal, state, and foreign land management agencies.


The Department of Defense’s commitment to integrating training readiness with the long-term environmental stewardship of military lands requires that professional military land managers, both civilian and military, be knowledgeable in a wide range of natural resources and environmental disciplines. To address critical issues in federal lands management, the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML) at Colorado State University offers three new online courses in Sustainable Military Lands Management, through a partnership with the Warner College of Natural Resources (WCNR). Click the image above to view a course description.

A post baccalaureate certificate in Sustainable Military Lands Management is available for those completing the following SMLM courses:

  1. Introduction to Sustainable Military Lands Management (NR 550)
  2. Cultural Resource Management on Military Lands (NR 551)
  3. Ecology of Military Lands (NR 552)

After completing this certificate, the student will have an enhanced command of military land management and understanding of the cultural and ecological significance of sustaining military lands, which are critical assets for training and testing activities, but they also harbor diverse (and often rare) flora and fauna and cultural resources that must be protected.

The SLML Program is a one-of-a-kind online education offering makes the conservation and sustainable management of natural and cultural resources on DoD lands accessible to civilian and military land management professionals throughout the world. For more information about SMLM, please download this PDF.

This program and many other efforts, CEMML supports the national defense mission by providing a range of technical services and environmental professionals experienced in the conservation and sustainable management of natural and cultural resources on Department of Defense lands.


Policy Research

MilCHAG is committed to critical thinking on issues relating to Cultural Property Protection (CPP) by U.S. Forces and conducts research that informs environmental and related policies, regulations and guidelines within the Department of Defense. We also share our findings within DoD and the academic community to foster awareness of CPP issues.

In August 2009 our CPP recommendations were accepted for inclusion in Chapter 6 [“Historical and Cultural Preservation”] of the USCENTCOM Contingency Environmental Guidance: Environmental Quality Regulation (R 200-2), which contains essential guidance, best management practices and environmental enforcement capability for heritage preservation for U.S. base camps and all contingency operations within the USCENTCOM Area of Responsibility.

USCENTCOM Command Engineer (CCJ4-E) served as proponent for this new regulation. USCENTCOM thus became the first Combatant Command with an environmental regulation that includes historical/cultural property protection in its official guidance.

By including Cultural Property Protection in Chapter 6, USCENTCOM R 200-2 served as a blueprint for adding CPP to the official environmental regulation of every Combatant Command.

MilCHAG’s policy research and recommendations have a single goal: to protect and enhance respect for the cultural heritage and cultural property of every nation in which DoD operates


CPP Bibliographical Database

MIlCHAG provides a comprehensive bibliography of more than 1,300 books, journal articles and white papers with annotations covering every aspect of Historical and Cultural Property Protection within the context of military operations in a downloadable database.

The bibliographic database is an ENDNOTE file created and annotated by CEMML Research Associate Alexandra Wallace (Colorado State University) with substantial bibliographic input from Dr. Patrizia LaPiscopia (University of Dublin).

The database is contained in a .zip archive, which you can download and access using your local computer by clicking the link below.

Click to Download the MilCHAG Cultural Property Protection andMilitary Operations Annotated Bibliographic Database

ENDNOTE X4 or ENDNOTE X5 is required to access the database.


The MilCHAG Cultural Property Protection and Military Operations Annotated Bibliography is a database of more than 1,300 bibliographic citations and links that can be downloaded to the user’s computer and accessed using EndNote X4 or EndNote X5

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ICOM Red Lists Database

This page provides easy access to the ICOM Red Lists, which are compiled by ICOM (International Council of Museums). The ICOM Red Lists classify the most endangered categories of cultural property in the most vulnerable areas of the world, in an effort to prevent them being illegally exported.

Due to the ongoing conflict in Syria, ICOM has published an Emergency Red List for Syria.

URLs and ICOM Red List pages and documents available on this webpage are protected under International Copyright © ICOM/International Council of Museums. All rights reserved.


For Operation Iraqi Freedom

MilCHAG subject matter experts provided CPP Reach Back Support for USCENTCOM personnel serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom via an online resource that provides:

  1. The basic “Do’s” and “Dont’s” of Cultural Property Protection;
  2. The doctrine, theory and application of Cultural Property Protection;
  3. DoD regulations and International / Iraqi / U.S. laws that govern the preservation, import and export of Iraqi cultural property;
  4. A historical timeline illustrated tour of Iraq’s cultural heritage;
  5. A brief quiz to test what the online visitor has learned about CPP.

For Operation Enduring Freedom

MilCHAG subject matter experts provided CPP Reach Back Support for USCENTCOM personnel serving in Operation Enduring Freedom via an online resource that provides:

  1. The basic “Do’s” and “Dont’s” of Cultural Property Protection;
  2. The doctrine, theory and application of Cultural Property Protection;
  3. DoD regulations and International / Afghan / U.S. laws that govern the preservation, import and export of Afghan cultural property;
  4. A historical timeline illustrated tour of Afghanistan’s cultural heritage;
  5. The 216 most significant archaeological and cultural / religious sites in Afghanistan that should be protected;
  6. A brief quiz to test what the online visitor has learned about CPP.

For Exercise Bright Star

MilCHAG subject matter experts provided CPP Reach Back Support for USCENTCOM and USARCENT/Third Army serving in Exercise Bright Star 2009 in Egypt.  This exercise included scenarios and situations involving Egyptian cultural property sites and monuments (see Master Scenario Events List examples created for these exercises by MilCHAG).

The Exercise Bright Star 2009 Reach Back Support resource provided:

  1. The basic “Do’s” and “Dont’s” of Cultural Property Protection;
  2. The doctrine, theory and application of Cultural Property Protection;
  3. DoD regulations and International / Egyptian / U.S. laws that govern the preservation, import and export of Egyptian cultural property;
  4. A historical timeline and illustrated tour of Egypt’s cultural heritage;
  5. A brief quiz to test what the online visitor has learned about CPP.

Commanders Guides

MilCHAG Commander’s Guides provides decision-makers in forward operating areas with detailed guidance on tactics and techniques for cultural property protection in real-world situations.

Regional Commander’s Guide: South Sudan

The Regional Commander’s Guide: South Sudan is intended for field commanders and staff planners who may deploy to or are currently deployed in South Sudan. It provides a brief background of the country, an overview of its cultural property and related operational concerns, and guidance for field commanders on avoiding cultural property incidents that could compromise mission objectives or undermine regional strategic goals and partnerships. This guide is designed as a regionally specific-companion to the more general Manual for Cultural Property Protection in the Deployed Environment.


Project ORCHID Publications

During the last decade, U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) has assumed responsibility for a vast array of cultural properties within its AOR in an effort to minimize harm during military operations and meet certain obligations under national and international law and DoD cultural resources policy. Through an ad hoc body, the CENTCOM Historical/Cultural Working Group (CHCAG), now known as the Military Cultural Heritage Advisory Group (MilCHAG), experts within DoD advocated for the development of a cultural heritage data inventory for use by all Combatant Commands (COCOMs).


Dr. Paul Green with George Clooney
U.S. Air Force Civil Engineer cultural resources specialist Dr. Paul Green (left) chats with actor and director George Clooney at a screening of the film “The Monuments Men” held at the White House on Feb. 18, 2014. Also in attendance, President Barack Obama took a moment to speak to Dr. Green and thank him for his service. Photo courtesy AFCEC/Released.

In the spring of 2009, U.S. Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) funds became available to begin an initiative known as Project ORCHID. Comprised of cultural resources professionals within the U.S. Air Force partnering with other stakeholders, Project ORCHID has established a baseline of institutional knowledge, procedures, and planning information to ensure that U.S. military personnel engaged in contingency actions, disaster response, and other related activities have sufficient visibility of significant host nation cultural properties to avoid or minimize harmful effects.

Conceived and managed by Dr. Paul Green of the Air Force Civil Engineer Center (AFCEC/CZO [East RST]), Project ORCHID has been executed for the Air Force by Dr. Jay Newman at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District.

The initial project objectives were divided into several areas. The first concerned supporting ongoing efforts, primarily by Dr. Laurie Rush at Fort Drum, U.S. Army, and Dr. James Zeidler, Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML) at Colorado State University, to develop cultural heritage training and awareness materials to all U.S. military personnel deploying to the USCENTCOM AOR. The second area focused on: (a) understanding international requirements and standards for the protection of cultural properties; (b) reviewing professional literature to determine how cultural heritage is valued around the world; and (c) forming a strategic planning workshop to guide current and future efforts.

From these efforts, several tasks have been developed to outline and implement a systematic approach for collecting, standardizing and, though protocols, sharing cultural heritage data across various COCOM AOR’s.

All volumes in the Project ORCHID Publication Series are For Official Use Only (FOUO).

Persons engaged directly or indirectly with official U.S. Government business and you have a legitimate need may request copies of Project ORCHID reports from Dr. Paul Green at paul.green@us.af.mil, subject line: “Project ORCHID Publication Request”.

1: OCONUS Cultural Heritage Site Protection and Planning and International and Local Valuation of Cultural Heritage Resources, by Diane L. Douglas and Gerry Wait. April 2012. 92 pp + appendices.

2: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Haiti, by Martha Graham, Diane L. Douglas, Carla R. Van West, and Kathleen A. Deagan. February 2013. 62 pp +appendices.

3: DoD Satellite Archaeology Manual for the Middle East, by Sarah H. Parcak. February 2013. 90 pp.

4: Military Cultural Resources Analysis Database User Manual. ORCHID: OCONUS Cultural Heritage Site Data Development, by Brian Crane, Chris Bowen, and Dennis Knepper. February 2014. 50 pp.

5: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Yemen, by Erin King and Brynn Stewart. January 2013. 30 pp + appendices.

6: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Islamic Republic of Mauritania, by Doug Park, Doug, Justin Bedard, James Wade Campbell, and Michelle Young. March 2013. 52 pp+ appendices.

“Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Libya,” prepared for U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District. U.S. Air Force Project ORCHID Series, Reports of Investigations, Number 7, November 2013.

7: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Libya, by Erin King. November 2013. 44 pp+ appendices.

8: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Islamic Republic of Pakistan, by Christian J. Zier and Travis R. Bugg. February 2013. 45 pp + appendices.

9: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Albania, by Christopher Goodmaster. January 2013. 65 pp + appendices.

10: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Mali, by Carla R. Van West and Susan Keech McIntosh. February 2013. 82 pp + appendices.

11: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, by Travis R. Bugg and Christian J. Zier. May 2013. 48 pp + appendices.

12: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Federal Republic of Nigeria, by Carrie Albee, Justin Bedard, James Wade Campbell, Wairimu Mwangi, and Michelle Young. July 2013. 54 pp + appendices.

13: Review of Data Mining Results for Haiti, Albania and Yemen and the Tangible Cultural Heritage Country Profile, by Arlene K. Fleming. April 2011. 21 pp.

14: Tangible Cultural Resources: Country Profiles, by Arlene K. Fleming. September 2011. 20 pp.

15: Cultural Heritage Data and Information: a Comparative Study of Standards and Practice for Collection, Management, and Use, by Arlene K. Fleming. September 2011. 199 pp.

16: A Strategic Workshop on Military Planning for Overseas Cultural Property Protection, Santa Fe, New Mexico, July 18-20, 2011, by Terry H. Klein, Lynne Sebastian, Carla R. Van West, and Nancy Kenmotsu. November 2011. 43 pp.

17: Quality Assurance/Quality Control of Archaeological Site Location Data in Afghanistan, by Stephen A. Sherman, Stephen A. and James A. Zeidler. December 2011. 119 pp. (Contains Sensitive but Unclassified Information; restricted distribution)

18: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: The Republic of the Sudan, by Marsha Prior and Erin King. May 2013. 40 pp + appendices.

19: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: The Republic of South Sudan, by Marsha Prior and Erin King. May 2013. 36 pp + appendices.

20: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria, by Martha Graham and Carla R. Van West. November 2013. 121 pp + appendices.

21: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Democratic Republic of the Congo, by Wade Campbell, Orofisola Fasehun, Wairimu Mwangi, and Doug Park. December 2013. 51 pp + appendices.

22: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Central African Republic, by Wade Campbell, Orofisola Fasehun, Wairimu Mwangi, and Doug Park. December 2013. 46 pp + appendices.

23: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Colombia, by Travis R. Bugg and Kristin A. Gensmer. November 2013. 55 pp + appendices.

24: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Republic of Niger, by Wade Campbell, Orofisola Fasehun, Wairimu Mwangi, and Doug Park . December 2013. 54 pp + appendices.

In preparation:

25: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Morocco

26: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Philippines

27: Tangible Cultural Resources Country Profile: Syria